Anak Krakatoa Volcano Webcam

April 3, 2008

Krakatoa is a stratovolcano in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia. It has erupted repeatedly, massively, and with disastrous consequences throughout recorded history.

krakotoe.jpg
Anak Krakatoa

The best known eruption culminated in a series of massive explosions on August 26–27, 1883, which was among the most violent volcanic events in modern times. With a Volcanic Explosivity Index of 6, it was equivalent to 200 megatons of TNT — about 13,000 times the yield of an Atomic detonation.

The KRAKMON systems consists of a number of geophysical, gas-geochemical and environmental measuring sites on the Krakatau island complex located in the Sunda Strait.

All data are acquired continuously and are transmitted to the Pasauran Observatory (Western Java) via digital radio telemetry. In Pasauran, the data are collected and transmitted to a server in Jakarta Indonesia via VSAT. From here, the data are accessible through internet. Go to the Camera (KM04) link to view the most recent archived images.

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3 Responses to “Anak Krakatoa Volcano Webcam”

  1. Richard Raburn Says:

    The webcam link has not worked for quite some time,
    and now one hears the volcano is becoming more
    active seismically. Has the project been
    terminated or is it a local issue?

    • sn00pm0nk3y Says:

      richard,

      sorry for delay. it’s not unusual for cams in remote areas of asia and africa to go down for months and then suddenly reappear. i’ve seen this happen several times…in remote thailand, kenya, and antarctica. the most recurrent issues are equipment failure, poor bandwidth, and funding.

      over the past three years i have seen Krakmon go down three times for an extended period only to return unexpectedly. searching the internet every week, i can find no information on the status of Krakmon. if i were to make a guess, i would say either bandwidth or funding is the culprit.

      consider the route taken by their data: “All data are acquired continuously and are transmitted to the Pasauran Observatory (Western Java) via digital radio telemetry. In Pasauran, the data are collected and transmitted to a server in Jakarta Indonesia via VSAT. From here, the data are accessible through internet.” the breakdown in communication could thus occur at any spot in the chain.

      personally, i think Krakmon got a lot of use and publicity after the eruption in 2007 with suddenly perhaps tens of thousands of new visitors. someone has to pay for the bandwidth. Krakmon is a scientific research project with a budget for the work they do in an area already devastated by the tsunami in 2004, and i’ve seen the plug pulled on some great webcams just because they got too popular and the municipal financial decision makers declined to pay for the extra bandwidth. so, perhaps Krakmon is now a private network and the link to the internet has been cut. but still, there are other possibilities and Krakmon may yet reappear.

      i’m going to sit tight, be patient, and continue to look for conclusive information before i remove the link. any news from viewers of course wold be appreciated.

  2. janet Douglas Says:

    2011 still off line, what gives?


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