Seaside Park NJ

May 24, 2014

Seaside Park is a borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States.

b3Seaside Park

Seaside Park is situated on the Barnegat Peninsula, a long, narrow barrier peninsula that separates Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean.

The first inhabitants of the barrier island were Lenape Native Americans who came in search of fish, crabs, clams, and scallops. They called this area “Seheyichbi,” meaning land bordering the ocean. The Atlantic Ocean provided more than food, these people began using shells in place of wooden beads as their form of currency. These Native Americans, who stayed during the summer and went inland for winter, were part of the principal Algonquian tribe that lived mainly in and around the North American Seaboard. The Algonquians in New Jersey called themselves “Lenni Lenape”, which means “original people.”

The area surrounding the peninsula were described by Henry Hudson, in 1609, as “…a great lake of water, as we could judge it to be … The mouth of the lake hath many shoals, and the sea breaketh on them as it is cast out of the mouth of it.” The name of the peninsula is derived from that of the adjacent inlet and bay, which were originally named in 1614 “Barendegat,” or “Inlet of the Breakers,” by Dutch settlers, referring to the waterway’s turbulent channel.

On March 8, 1962, Seaside Park was affected by a nor’easter that had churned offshore for two days. The storm, which destroyed a learge section of the borough’s boardwalk, is variously referred to as the Ash Wednesday Storm, the Five High Storm and the Great March Storm of 1962.

A second Camera is located at Seaside Heights here.

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Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People is a bridge under construction across the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon.

bridge Tilikum Crossing

Although it is being built as part of TriMet’s MAX Orange Line light rail line, the bridge will carry MAX Light Rail, the Portland Streetcar, buses, bicycles, pedestrians, and emergency vehicles. Private cars and trucks will not be permitted on the bridge. The crossing is scheduled to open in the fall of 2015 and will be the first new bridge built across the Willamette River since 1973.

Tilikum is a Chinook word meaning people, tribe, or family, and the name is intended to honor the Multnomah, Cascade, Clackamas, and other Chinookan peoples who lived in the area as long as 14,000 years ago.

City planners initially focused on three designs: cable-stayed, wave-frame girder, and through arch, but the design committee eventually recommended a hybrid suspension/cable-stayed design.  Construction of the bridge began in June 2011, with a slow/no wake zone put in place to ensure the safety of river users and bridge construction workers. Beginning in July 2011, an exclusion area around the in-water bridge construction site went into effect. Construction of the bridge itself is scheduled for completion in 2014, followed by several months of work to install tracks and other infrastructure across the bridge, with opening for public use in 2015.

Castine, Maine Webcamera

January 21, 2014

Castine is a town in Hancock County, Maine, United States and served as the capital of Acadia (1670–1674).

Capture5Castine

Called Majabigwaduce by Tarrantine Abenaki Indians, Castine is one of the oldest towns in New England, predating the Plymouth Colony by seven years. Situated on Penobscot Bay, it is near the site of Fort Pentagouet.  Few places in New England have had a more tumultuous history than Castine—which proclaims itself the “battle line of four nations.”

The Castine peninsula appears on a 1612 chart submitted to King Henry IV of France by Samuel de Champlain, who called it the Pentagoët Peninsula. As part of Henry’s program to defend Acadia, Castine was founded in the winter of 1613, when Claude de Saint-Etienne de la Tour established a small trading post to conduct business with the Tarrantine Indians (now called the Penobscots)

At the end of the French and Indian War, which secured English title to North America, the unoccupied lands along the Maine coast were opened to settlement by Massachusetts colonists. Though the fur trade was long dead, the region’s abundant fisheries and timber attracted entrepreneurs, and the attention of the British government, which was always on the lookout for store to supply its growing navy. Bagaduce was especially valuable for supplying timber suitable for masts on British warships.

Castine is the home of Maine Maritime Academy, a four-year institution that graduates officers and engineers for the United States Merchant Marine and marine related industries.

Lake Hood, Alaska Webcamera

October 20, 2013

Lake Hood Seaplane Base (ICAO: PALH) is a state-owned seaplane base located three nautical miles (6 km) southwest of the central business district of Anchorage in Alaska.

hood2Lake Hood

Operating continuously and open to the public, Lake Hood is the world’s busiest seaplane base, handling an average of 190 flights per day. It is located on Lakes Hood and Spenard, next to Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, three miles from downtown Anchorage.  For 12-month period ending August 1, 2005, the seaplane base had 69,400 aircraft operations, an average of 190 per day: 88% general aviation, 12% air taxi and <1% military. There are 781 aircraft based at this seaplane base: 97% single engine and 3% multi-engine.

The city is on a strip of coastal lowland and extends up the lower alpine slopes of the Chugach Mountains. Point Campbell, the westernmost point of Anchorage on the mainland, juts out into Cook Inlet near its northern end, at which point it splits into two arms. To the south is Turnagain Arm, a fjord that has some of the world’s highest tides. Knik Arm, another tidal inlet, lies to the west and north. The Chugach Mountains on the east form a boundary to development, but not to the city limits, which encompass part of the wild alpine territory of Chugach State Park.

The city’s seacoast consists mostly of treacherous mudflats. Newcomers and tourists are warned not to walk in this area because of extreme tidal changes and the very fine glacial silt. Unwary victims have walked onto the solid seeming silt revealed when the tide is out and have become stuck in the mud.

Fairbanks is the largest city in the Interior region of Alaska, and second largest in the state, after Anchorage.

goldenheart02Fairbanks

Fairbanks is located in the central Tanana Valley, straddling the Chena River near its confluence with the Tanana River. Immediately north of the city is a chain of hills that rises gradually until it reaches the White Mountains and the Yukon River. The southern border of the city is the Tanana River. South of the river is the Tanana Flats, an area of marsh and bog that stretches for more than 100 miles  until it rises into the Alaska Range, which is visible from Fairbanks on clear days

Fairbanks’ climate is usually classified as subarctic with long, cold winters, and short, warm summers, in which much of the annual precipitation falls.  In Fairbanks, winter lasts from late September/early October until late April/early May. October through January are the snowiest, and snow is limited from February to May. On average, the season’s first snow falls in Fairbanks on September 21 and the first inch of snow accumulates by October 8. The snowpack is established by October 18, on average, and remains until May.

Electricity is provided by the Golden Valley Electric Association. The Chena power site has four steam turbines fueled by coal and one oil-fueled electrical generator. Interior Alaska is not connected to the electrical grid of the contiguous United States and Canada, but a transmission line constructed in 1985 connects Fairbanks with power plants in the coal producing area of Healy and the Anchorage area. Fairbanks currently holds the world record for the largest rechargeable battery, which weighs approximately 1,300 tons. The battery was installed to help bridge the gaps that occur during frequent power outages. The battery will provide power for 7 minutes to about 12,000 homes.

Los Angeles International Airport (IATA: LAXICAO: KLAX, FAA LID: LAX) is the primary airport serving the Greater Los Angeles Area

Cargo City

In 2011, LAX was the sixth busiest airport in the world after Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Beijing Capital International Airport, London Heathrow Airport, Chicago O’Hare International Airport, and Tokyo Haneda International Airport with 61,862,052 passengers.

The “Imperial Hill” area (also known as Clutter’s Park) in El Segundo from which the South Complex of the airport can be viewed is a prime location for aircraft spotting. Another spotting location sits under the final approach for runways 24 L&R on a lawn next to the Westchester In-N-Out Burger. This is one of the few remaining locations in Southern California from which spotters may watch such a wide variety of low-flying commercial airliners from directly underneath a flightpath.

The distinctive white “Theme Building”, designed by Pereira & Luckman architect Paul Williams and constructed in 1961 by Robert E. McKee Construction Co., resembles a flying saucer that has landed on its four legs. A restaurant with a sweeping view of the airport is suspended beneath two arches that form the legs. The Los Angeles City Council designated the building a cultural and historical monument in 1992. A $4 million renovation, with retro-futuristic interior and electric lighting designed by Walt Disney Imagineering, was completed before the “Encounter Restaurant” opened there in 1997.

KLAX live audio feed courtesy LiveATC.net

Guaymas, Mexico Webcam

February 24, 2012

Guaymas is a city  in the southwest part of the state of Sonora in northwestern Mexico, and  south of the state capital of Hermosillo, 242 miles from the U.S. border.

Guaymas

Before the arrival of the Europeans, the areas now known as Guaymas was dominated by the Guaymas, Seri and Yaqui tribes.In 1539, two Spanish ships, the Santa Agueda and El Trinidad, arrived to Guaymas Bay.  In the late 18th and early 19th century, there was supposedly only one inhabitant in Guaymas, called “Tio Pepe” (Uncle Pepe), who was said to be a drunk and a thief.

Guaymas is basically an industrial and shrimp-fishing port which has conserved a number of historical attractions. Buildings in the historic center have a mix of Neoclassical and Moorish facades, however many are in disrepair. The city has two main plazas, one called 13 de Julio, which is nicknamed the “plaza de los flojos” (lazy men’s plaza) for the large number of people who relax there.

The Guaymas-Empalme station for space observations is about six miles east of Empalme, Sonora, adjacent to Mexican Federal Highway No. 15. It is operated by the Mexican Space Agency. As a major link in the NASA‘s worldwide Manned Space Flight Network, the Guaymas Tracking Station, built in 1961, played a key role in tracking American manned space flights in the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs through Apollo 13.